All posts tagged: Fermentation Radio

Emma Inch wins top writing award

Brighton based beer writer and radio broadcaster Emma Inch has been named Beer Writer of the Year 2018 at the Guild of Beer Writers’ annual awards ceremony last night alongside six other women writers and brewers. Beer Writer of the Year is the top award in the Guild’s annual competition for writing about beer and pubs, which this year received more than 140 entries across nine categories. Inch won two category awards – National Media and Online Communication – on her way to the top prize. Emma is the creator and presenter of Fermentation Radio, the UK’s only regular beer and brewing show on FM radio. She has written for a number of national and international publications, judges regularly at beer competitions and this summer established the first Brighton & Hove Beer Week. Adrian Tierney-Jones, chair of judges this year after taking the Beer Writer of the Year title in 2017, said, “All the judges found it exceptionally hard to choose the winners and runners up from the very strong field of entries received this year. …

How to sell beer to everyone

Emma Inch from the Fermentation Beer and Brewing Show caught up with beer writers, Jessica Mason and Pete Brown to talk to them about their recent presentation at Imbibe live entitled: ‘How to sell beer to everyone’ Pete, himself, an ex-beer ad-man, describes how the beer marketing industry got itself into the macho world of lads and sport in the first place and Jess offers their six straight-forward ideas  to promote beer to more people – particularly for pub and bar operators. Listen to the Fermentation podcast here, first broadcast on 22 July 2018. Skip forward to 49 minutes in for the 7 minute clip.

Do You Pass the Bechdel Test?

Here’s Emma Inch’s article from December 2017 about how The Bechdel Test could be applied to the beer scene: ‘Beer people are lovely people!’ and ‘The beer industry is a wonderful, friendly place!’ are things I’ve been told on a number of occasions since jumping boots-first into the scene a couple of years ago. And, for me, there’s a lot of truth in these celebratory statements. I spent the first two decades of my working life in an environment where I didn’t always see the best of how things could be. As a frontline social worker – and more latterly, a social work academic – I bore witness to desperation, deprivation, and sometimes degradation on a scale most would find hard to contemplate. I met many, many good people on both sides of the intervention divide – some of the bravest, warmest, creative, most intelligent people there are – and I have a lasting respect for them all. I also derived a great deal of satisfaction from my work, and felt immensely privileged to work …